NEWS

NEWS FROM SHARED HISTORY

  • Shared History was Awarded Best Film/Video on Matters Relating to the Black Experience at the XXIII, Black International Cinema Berlin in 2008.  
  • Shared History has launched 2 new blogs:  Shared History and Just Like Family, a blog that explores the relationship of African American housekeepers with the white children they raised.  The blog will include commentary from the adult white children as well as the biological children of these woomen.
  • In 2009, the Shared History project website was updated and revised and now includes a Discussion Guide.  The guide will help community group encourage audience discussion after a screening of the film.  The discussion guide was developed by Frank Martin, South Carolina State University, and Felicia Furman, Producer/Director of Shared History.
  •  A new authoring of the Shared History DVD now includes bonus documentaries:  

In the Beginning is a 20 minute documentary on the making of “Shared History” and offers additional interviews with members of the Woodlands families who as children had known their formerly enslaved ancestors.

Scholars at Woodlands provides different views of the relationship between the black and white families at Woodlands with scholars Jualynne E. Dodson, Walter B. Edgar and Karen E. Fields.

The DVD also includes the trailer of the Shared History documentary and clips of three people featured in the film:   Rhonda Kearse, Charles Orr, and Dorothy Manigault.

  • Shared History is now on Facebook and has YouTube and Vimeo channels as well, which include the bonus documentary In the Beginning and Scholars at Woodlands.   The sites will also include clips from additional trailers and Shared History video footage that did not make it into the film.   This footage  includes important oral history interviews and documentation of cultural activities such as Junior Manigault continuing the Rumph family tradition of syrup making. 
  • The recently re-authored DVD also includes the bonus documentaries In the Beginning and Scholars at Woodlands.
  • The Shared History documentary completed its 4-year contract with PBS Plus in February 2010.  During this time, public television stations from all over the country broadcast the film.
  •  Felicia Furman and Charles Orr were invited to participate in the Coming to the Table workshop entitled Extending the Table:  Healing the Legacy of Slavery in America, August 15 – 17, 2008.  The program was sponsored by the Fetzer Institue.  Coming to the Table members include “paired”descendants of the enslaved and slave owner families–families that lived and worked on the same plantations.  The organization addresses the legacies of slavery in the United States. On their website you will find stories related to slavery’s legacies—under the topics history, healing, connecting and action. You will also find resources, events, news and a community to join for connecting and sharing. 
  •  In February, 2009, Rhonda Kearse and Felicia Furman screened Shared History at Converse College in Spartanburg, SC.
  •  On January 11, 2008 co-producer Vivian Glover presented a screening and discussion of the film at the Harvard Club in New York City attended by approximately 50 members.  
  • The Woodlands Families Oral History Collection was established at the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina,  Columbia, SC, in April of 2008.  The Collection includes interviews with many descendants of the Woodlands families who knew ancestors who had been enslaved at Woodlands Plantation before the Civil War.  There are also photographs, letters, legal records, genealogies and plantation records that will be available to scholars and to members of the Woodlands families.  

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